Susan Spess Shay

Still playing make believe.


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10 Random Unnecessaries and One NECESSARY

This is a kind of weird day, so get ready for a weird post. Okay? If it’s not okay, come back and see me tomorrow. Maybe I won’t be as weird then. Or I might be weirder. Who knows?

Random Unnecessary #1: I love coffee early in the morning. Hot coffee. Really hot coffee that burns on the way down. By the time I get to work, I’m usually through drinking java.

🙂 Unless I find a Starbucks. I love Starbucks.

Caramel Macchiato

and Cinnamon Dolce Latte

BTW: They won’t look like the pictures. The hot drinks come in a white cup with a long-haired woman wearing a crown with a star in front.

Green logo used from 1987-2010, still being us...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Yeah, she looks a little odd, but once you taste the coffee for the first time, you won’t notice her again.

If you haven’t tried either one of these, put them on your Bucket List. Try them before you die. They’re yummers!

Warning: Don’t check calorie content. If you do you’ll be tempted to drink their diet version which they call a Skinny. STEP AWAY FROM THE SKINNY. Go for the gusto and drink the real thing! It’s delish!

Random unnecessary #2: I hate Easter Egg hunts. I’m so ashamed. (Not really.) I’ve always hated EEH, even when I was a little kid BECAUSE I COULD NEVER FIND ANY EASTER EGGS.

The first birthday party I remember having was an EEH, and it was awful. We lived in Old Ford in a house with my dad’s parents. Behind our house we had a big pasture or a field. I’m not sure which you’d call it, but it didn’t grow anything but grass and we normally didn’t keep animals there. (We had a few chickens, but that’s all I remember.)

Anyway, Mom gave me an Easter Egg Hunt for my birthday. The kids who came were also my cousins, and they were mostly older than me. About the time I’d see an egg, someone else would snatch it.

I think I cried in frustration, but I might have pouted. Or thrown what my folks liked to call a whing-ding. (Tantrum for the uneducated.) Anyway, my daddy took me by the hand and helped me hunt for the stupid eggs. I even remember him saying, “This one’s easy to find. Let’s leave it for David.” That was my cousin just younger than me, and I liked him a lot, so I agreed.

I don’t remember ever having another Easter Egg birthday party. (Thanks, Mom!)

NECESSARY Thing: #4 is a grandmommy. Again. And the baby is adorable!  It’s not right or fair, but it’s true. She has two grandchildren and another on the way. #2 has three kids making her a grandmommy, #3 has two and I don’t have any.

If I threw a whing-ding, I wonder if it would help? 😉

Random Unnecessary #3: I went to Ozark Bible College (now Ozark Christian College) in Joplin for two years before moving on to study Fashion Merchandising.

Random Unnecessary #4: The first year I was at Ozark, I set a record. I was campused more times than anyone had ever been campused in the history of the school. Hard to believe, isn’t it? 🙂

Campused was kind of like grounded. You could go to class and to eat, but you weren’t supposed to do anything else. At least anything fun. But since we had to be in our dorms by 7:00 and lights out was at 11:00, there wasn’t time to do anything fun anyway.

Random Unnecessary #5: One of my roommates at Ozark and I used to play Gin Rummy by candlelight after lights out. (I hope Mom Thompson doesn’t read this and campus me retroactively.)

I’m not naming any names, but this is my roommate who tempted me into playing.

I’m on the left. My fun roommate is on the right.

Random Unnecessary #6: TVs were against the rules at Ozark. Once this same roommate snuck her TV into our room so we could watch a “star,” who played the ukulele and sang about tiptoeing through flowers, get married to a girl on national TV.

We had to muffle our laughter with pillows to keep from getting caught. There wasn’t enough space for all the girls on our floor to come in our room.

 Random Unnecessary #7: When I was at Ozark, my friends and I liked to swim in a strip mine near the town of Oronogo. It looked like a giant hole in the ground big enough for most of Old Ford to fit in, where I guess some mining company has used high pressure water to wash away the soil and ferret out minerals.

We jumped off high cliffs and swam underwater into caves. (The cave wasn’t underwater, only the entrance was.)

The pit was rumored to be bottomless. “The bottom has washed away because of underground springs, so no one knows how deep it is. Even scuba divers have tried to find it and can’t go that deep.” (Riiiight.)

Supposedly the strip pit was where Evil Doers went to ditch stolen cars, and once an entire train, whose track ran right next to the big hole, fell in and disappeared forever.

 Random Unnecessary #8: I was a basketball cheerleader when I was at Ozark. (You know the old saying: Those who can’t play, cheer.) Once a team from Manhattan, Kansas, came down to play on a school night.

That night, there was an exception made for bb players and cheerleaders. We got to be out late. And after the game, since the team had so far to go back to Manhattan, we had a little get together and fed them.

Cheerleaders were supposed to go straight back to the dorm after that, but I went roller skating instead. AND I DIDN’T GET CAUGHT!!! (For once.)

Random Unnecessary #9: My man and I almost had our wedding supper at Denny’s. (My idea.) Luckily, it was too crowded, so we went to the hotel where we stayed and had a really nice dinner. I had fried shrimp. 🙂

Random Unnecessary #10: Today is my birthday. Don’t ask.

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WGT– Miracles in Joplin

Isn’t it a Small Town World? Neighbors reaching out from across the state and from other states to lend a hand in Joplin to those hurting and in need.

Don’t you love hearing about the Small Town attitude in America?

I think I’ve mentioned that I attended Ozark Christian College back in the dark ages. My heart broke as I listened to the news about the devistation of Joplin. A woman I knew at the school was killed in the storm. Several people I knew (and who wouldn’t remember me) including a wonderful professor, had their homes destroyed.

If you’ve paid attention, you’ve seen God’s hand in the recovery time and time again. I wanted to share some of it with you in case you’d missed it.

I’m taking this directly from Discovery Ministries website. I can’t share all of it (I hope I’m not breaking the law by sharing what I am) but I hope you’ll click over and read the entire story.   BTW: CHCC is College Heights Christian Church. DM is Discovery Ministries. I just copied a part from the second half of the account. Please read the entire story if you have time.

The Joplin tornado happened on May 22nd. On the 23rd, seven people from Discovery Ministries drove to Joplin and made a call to find out what was happening.

We thought for a moment and figured we could help right then. In
incident-command training, we had learned that taking notes of what decisions are made the first few hours of a crisis helps in the following hours and days.

Since we teach communication and other principles for effective meetings, we are good note takers. Jeremy and I each took a radio, note pad and pencil. The rest of the DM group prayed and waited with a radio for further instructions. Jeremy quickly followed Jay and I shadowed Randy.

As I recorded what time Randy told which person to do what task, Randy noticed me and asked who I was and what I was doing. I told him my name, that I was with DM and that I was taking notes for him. He gave me a little smile and a nod and then turned to continue making decisions.

There’s a lot more to this story I’m skipping–please find time to read it. I wanted you to see the glory of God’s touch.

The rest of the story of the miracles Jesus worked this week would fill volumes.
I’ll give a summary.

Monday approximately 6:30 p.m., CHCC and DM entered a relationship I will fondly remember forever. I immediately called Colette and
asked her to partner with . . . three guys with lots of experience in incident command – to join in praying specifically for the challenges they knew, better than we, that we faced.

Lisa and Kim, two original recruits from the church, joined the DM team to design the intake, sorting and distribution of donations and training of volunteers to run that system.

We finished at 2:30 a.m. Tuesday. That basic system, with numerous improvements made by many people and organizations, continues functioning as I write this report at 9:25 a.m. Saturday morning.

I am still amazed at the number of victims we were able to assist. I know that by Wednesday evening we had distributed food, clothing, and other basic essentials to over 2,000 people, fed over 2,000 meals to volunteers, and had unbelievable opportunities for ministry, including one request for baptism.

My favorite element of the system was the Personal Shopping Assistants (PSA’s). These volunteers met each person at the entrance, introduced themselves, and carried people’s items for them.

They tried to connect with people, asking their stories of survival, praying, laughing, hugging and crying with them. It was amazing how many big hearted and courageous volunteers made the whole system run and how they constantly made the system better.

The Big Questions

How did a church staff that functions on a collaborative-unity model get connected with a small ministry that functions on a collaborative-unity model at just the right time?

How did the right people show up during the week, hundreds of times, just before we realized they were needed? How did those people courageously accept the challenge after briefly considering the magnitude of what they were being asked to do?

Zechariah 4: 6 “’Not by might nor by power, but by My Spirit,’
says the LORD of hosts.” (1995 NASB).

Saying that CHCC, DM or any other person or organization involved, really did great things is somewhat like saying the tools in the toolbox built a house. Jesus is the Master Carpenter.

If you have a moment, please, please, please go to Discovery Ministries and read the entire account. I promise you’ll be blessed.

Praying for Joplin.