Susan Spess Shay

Still playing make believe.


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Oven Fried

Kentucky Fried Chicken/KFC Original Recipe chi...

That’s right–not Kentucky Fried. OVEN fried. 🙂

Brother Jeffrey shared Mom’s recipe for Potato Chip Chicken the other day, so I thought I’d pass it on to you.

His family ate it for their Christmas dinner, which they had a few days after the 25th when his daughter and her family made it home. (Any day’s Christmas when you’re family is together. Right?)

And as Brother Jeffrey says, “The proof of a good recipe is when you eat it all–even when it’s leftovers.”

I agree!

So, here’s his recipe.

Jeffrey’s Potato Chip Chicken
Enough chicken for your crew, cut up.
pepper chicken
dip in Pet Milk
roll in crushed potato chips to cover really well.

Put on baking sheet and bake at 400 degrees for one hour or until all pink is gone.

Thinking about JPCC, I remembered a similar recipe that came from Pryor Creek.

Pryor Creek Chicken

Melt 1 stick of butter (1/2 C) in baking dish.
Roll cut up chicken in biscuit mix and put in melted butter
Cover with foil.
Bake at 400 degrees for 45 minutes, then 350 degrees for 15 minutes.

Easy Peasy, right? 🙂

With all this chicken talk, I remembered one more. It’s from Ina Garten, the Barefoot Contessa and one of my favorite cookbook authors.

This is from the Food Network website.

BTW: I’ve made this recipe several times, and I’ve never soaked the chicken in buttermilk over night. Usually, I dip it in the buttermilk and get to cooking. 🙂

Oven-Fried Chicken

Copyright 2002, Barefoot Contessa Family Style, All Rights Reserved

Prep Time:
15 min
Inactive Prep Time:
10 hr 0 min
Cook Time:
40 min
Level:
Intermediate
Serves:
6 servings

Ingredients

 

  • 2 chickens (3 pounds each), cut in 8 serving pieces
  • 1 quart buttermilk
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Vegetable oil or vegetable shortening

 

Directions

Place the chicken pieces in a large bowl and pour the buttermilk over them. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Combine the flour, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Take the chicken out of the buttermilk and coat each piece thoroughly with the flour mixture. Pour the oil into a large heavy-bottomed stockpot to a depth of 1-inch and heat to 360 degrees F on a thermometer.

Working in batches, carefully place several pieces of chicken in the oil and fry for about 3 minutes on each side until the coating is a light golden brown (it will continue to brown in the oven). Don’t crowd the pieces. Remove the chicken from the oil and place each piece on a metal baking rack set on a sheet pan. Allow the oil to return to 360 degrees F before frying the next batch. When all the chicken is fried, bake for 30 to 40 minutes, until the chicken is no longer pink inside. Serve hot.

From Susan–
Since you’ll be cooking for your family, fix the chicken the way you like it. Sometimes I add a little garlic powder or cayenne pepper for extra flavor.
However you cook it, be sure you eat it with those you love.
And, as always, enjoy!
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Happy 4th of July!!!

Happy Independence Day!

Wow, it’s been a day or two since I’ve been here. I could do a whiney-hiney, but I won’t. LOL. Instead I’ll share another 4th of July picture I found online.

Need something to keep a little one occupied today? There are some great 4th of July coloring pages at Apples 4 the Teacher. Check it out. 🙂

Our kids are all coming today to share our celebration with us–Lord willing! What are we having? The same thing we have every 4th. FRIED CHICKEN!!!

Yes, I fry chickens every 4th of July. Today it’s FOUR FOR THE FOURTH! I love good fried chicken, but it makes such a mess, I try to only make it once a year.

I started doing chicken for the 4th years ago when the boys were little and we still lived in Pryor Creek. After all this time, they won’t let me stop even though the 4th is usually the hottest day of the year. Oy!

One year we packed up our chicken and went to OKC and visited the WWII museum, the zoo and the Omniplex, which I understand has been renamed Science Museum Oklahoma. We also visited a museum full of war memorabilia. Maybe the Infantry Museum? It’s been a long time and we haven’t been back. Mostly, I remember how much G-Man enjoyed that place and how much the kids didn’t. LOL.

If you haven’t been to Science Museum Oklahoma, you should go! I had a fantastic time, and my boys loved it. All my boys, including the big one.

After we moved home to C-Town, I kept frying. One year we had both my dad and G-Man’s on the 4th. They loved it. I loved it . . . once I was through frying. 🙂

I learned how at Mama’s (and Grandmother’s and Aunt Phyllis’s) knee. Here’s how we do it:

Soak the cut up chicken in salted water for a few hours before you start frying.

  • Into a brown paper bag put a few cups of flour, salt, plenty of pepper. (I add a teaspoon or two of garlic powder for another layer of flavor.)
  • Put a pan with an inch or so of vegetable oil on to heat.
  • Take the chicken out of the water, one piece at a time, shake off the water and drop into the sack of flour. When you have three or four pieces in the bag, shake it up and carefully place in the heated oil.
  • Cover with a lid and fry until almost done, then remove the lid and turn up the heat just a little to get the chicken crispy brown.
  • Turn the heat back down as you start your next pan of chicken.

Warning: Don’t get the oil too hot in the beginning. The chicken will get done on the outside and stay uncooked in the  middle. Nobody likes that!

I also make Ina Garten’s potato salad. It’s not Mama’s salad, but it’s sooo good. (This is from http:Foodnetwork.com

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds small red potatoes
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 cup good mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk, milk, or white wine
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh dill
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion

Directions

Place the potatoes and 2 tablespoons of salt in a large pot of water. Bring the water to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, until the potatoes are barely tender when pierced with a knife. Drain the potatoes in a colander, then place the colander with the potatoes over the empty pot and cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Allow the potatoes to steam for 15 to 20 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, buttermilk, Dijon mustard, whole-grain mustard, dill, 1 teaspoon of salt, and 1 teaspoon of pepper. Set aside. When the potatoes are cool enough to handle, cut them into quarters or halves, depending on their size. Place the cut potatoes in a large bowl. While the potatoes are still warm, pour enough dressing over them to moisten. (As the salad sits, you may need to add more dressing.) Add the celery and red onion, 2 teaspoons of salt and 1 teaspoon of pepper. Toss well, cover, and refrigerate for a few hours to allow the flavors to blend. Serve cold or at room temperature.

BTW: In a slightly different version of this recipe, she calls for fresh tarragon as well as dill. If you raise your own herbs, it makes it even better! Or maybe you can’t tell tell the difference. LOL.

How are you celebrating? Going to the lake? Having a wienie roast? Gonna blow up your world with M-80’s?

Why not share your fun with us?


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Grandmommy Corn

Corn female flower AKA corn silk. The incipien...

Image via Wikipedia

My mom was a great cook. All the women and most of the men in my family are, but Mom was an extra special cook.

She grew up during the depression. At that time everyone–dads, moms, grandparents and kids helped make ends meet, especially if you came from a farm family.

The reason she could cook so well was because she didn’t want to chop cotton in the field, so she’d volunteer to cook. If she hadn’t done a great job, they wouldn’t have let her keep cooking. (And I wouldn’t blame them.)

Mama’s corn would make your tongue lap your brains out. (Saying courtesy of Grandad Ray.)

Grandmommie Corn–

I usually start with eight or ten ears of corn. Shuck them and cut off the kernals, but not too close to the cob. When you have all the corn off, go back and scrape the cob with the edge of your knife to get the “milk” out. (Mama said that’s what thickens the corn.) 

Melt a couple of tablespoons of bacon drippings in a heavy skillet. (Enough to cover the bottom.) When it’s hot, add the corn and saute for a few minutes. Yellow corn will turn bright yellow. How long you saute it depends on how much corn you have and how big your pan is.

After several minutes, add a tablespoon or two of sugar (depending on how sweet the corn is) salt and pepper to taste. (Don’t you hate it when someone says that?) Stir.

Then add enough half-and-half (heavy cream or milk–I use 2% milk because that’s what I usually have on hand) to make it look like creamed corn. Heat to a  simmer, but don’t let the cream come to a rolling boil. (It’ll curdle.)

Taste to make sure it’s good and serve.

While everyone is telling you how brilliant you are to be able to cook like that, say a little prayer of thank for my mama. She was the best!


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Thanks, Ina, For Your Corn Chowder

Barefoot Contessa Cookbook

Image via Wikipedia

This is a Barefoot Contessa recipe. Ina Garten is the Barefoot Contessa. She’s on the Food Channel if you want to watch her.

The way they film her cooking is great. Her camera men get right in there and fill the screen with food as if they were taking a still shot to frame and hang on the wall.

She just looks like she’d be fun to know, doesn’t she? I’d love to be her friend. Her background is fascinating. She worked in the Whitehouse at one time (NOT in a foodie capasity) then she moved to New York State where she bought The Barefoot Contessa. I don’t think it was a restaurant, but from what I can tell on TV, they prepared food sort of like a deli, except it was remarkable food. 

I have all her cookbooks except  her newest one, and I already have it on my list for my birthday. (Fingers crossed.)

Here’s one G-Man requests on a regular basis–

Ina’s Corn Chowder

  • 8 ounces bacon, chopped
  • 1/4 cup good olive oil
  • 6 cups chopped yellow onions (4 large onions)
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 12 cups chicken stock
  • 6 cups medium-diced white boiling potatoes, unpeeled (2 pounds)
  • 10 cups corn kernels, fresh (10 ears) or frozen (3 pounds)
  • 2 cups half-and-half
  • 1/2 pound sharp white cheddar cheese, grated

Directions

In a large stockpot over medium-high heat, cook the bacon and olive oil until the bacon is crisp, about 5 minutes. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon and reserve. Reduce the heat to medium, add the onions and butter to the fat, and cook for 10 minutes, until the onions are translucent.

Stir in the flour, salt, pepper, and turmeric and cook for 3 minutes. Add the chicken stock and potatoes, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. If using fresh corn, cut the kernels off the cob and blanch them for 3 minutes in boiling salted water. Drain. (If using frozen corn you can skip this step.) Add the corn to the soup, then add the half-and-half and cheddar. Cook for 5 more minutes, until the cheese is melted. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Serve hot with a garnish of bacon.

Now just to be honest, I’ve never made it exactly like Ina does. For a long time, I couldn’t find tumeric, so I left it out. When I found it, I learned I didn’t like the flavor.

Why ruin a good thing? I leave it out.

And the grocery store in C-Town doesn’t carry white cheddar. Let me amend that. If the grocer in C-Town carries white cheddar, I can’t find it. 😉 I just use regular mild cheddar. (White sounds mild to me.) 

I’ve never used fresh corn in this recipe–only frozen. (Fresh corn is for grilling and eating off the cob or in Grandmommy Corn. I’ll post that another time.)

 And if I don’t have chicken stock, I made the stuff with cubes and boiling water.

Okay, that’s it. It’s a wonderful recipe and makes a lot. (I cut it in half and we still have it for a whole week.)

I’m sending a big Thank You! to Ina. You make eating at my house taste so much better!